wisdom to survive

THURSDAY, MAY 5TH, POTLUCK7 PM- 8:30 PM

The Wisdom to Survive

Climate Change Capitalism & Community sponsored by our Green Team!

THE WISDOM TO SURVIVE accepts the consensus of scientists that climate change has already arrived, and asks, what is keeping us from action? The film explores how unlimited growth and greed are destroying the life support system of the planet, the social fabric of society, and the lives of billions of people.

Will we have the wisdom to survive? The film features thought leaders and activists in the realms of science, economics and spirituality discussing how we can evolve and take action in the face of climate disruption. They urge us to open ourselves to the beauty that surrounds us and get to work on ensuring it thrives.  See video preview here.

Among those featured are Bill McKibben, Joanna Macy, Nikki Cooley, Roger Payne, Richard Heinberg, Amy Seidl, Stephanie Kaza, Gus Speth, Jihan Gearan, and Ben Falk.

Praise for Wisdom to Survive

This film is deeply moving and profoundly engaging. Indeed, it has the potential to transform lives because it provides visions of how we should live in the midst of massive environmental challenges. I cannot recommend it more highly!”—Mary Evelyn Tucker, Forum on Religion & Ecology at Yale

This is a starkly prophetic film. It combines the direst of warnings with deep love of life. Better than any other film I know, it makes clear that our profit-oriented growth economy has caused the climate catastrophe and cannot itself rescue us from disaster. We need new thinking and a new way of life.”—Tom F. Driver,  Paul Tillich Professor Emeritus of Systematic Theology, Union Theological Seminary

Duration : 56 min.

Questions: Contact cath.kessler@comcast.net or ngtaylor94619@yahoo.com

Skyline Community Church is a member of Jubilee East Bay, a chapter of Jubilee USA Network, an alliance of 75 US organizations, 400 faith communities, and 50 global partners.  Jubilee is building an economy that serves, protects and promotes the participation of the most vulnerable.

Tuesday, May 5, Skyline is hosting a Jubilee Lunch & Learn from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM.  Join us for a lunch, presentation of what Jubilee does, successes, and an action item to take home to your congregation.

Please RSVP to KateDoherty.ctk@gmail.com.  Thank you!  See you there!

Thanks to everyone who joined us to celebrate good weather, good food, and great company, last Sunday at our picnic potluck celebration. Special thanks to Marilyn Shaw for her leadership!

There’s something so beautiful, so biblical, so communal about sharing our food together, when we share so much more than just food together. We exchange recipes, and stories, we sit outside and behold the beauty of the earth, and appreciate the preciousness of springtime, we’re inspired to laugh and play, like children do. We share our common lives and our humanity.

Unlike the rest of the world’s democracies the United States doesn’t celebrate May Day as an official national holiday.

But outside the U.S., May 1 is International Workers’ Day, observed with speeches, rallies and demonstrations. This year, millions of workers in Europe, Asia and Latin America will be taking to the streets to demand higher wages, better benefits and improved working conditions. In Bangladesh, for example, protestors will be in the streets to demand that global companies like Walmart improve safety standards in local sweatshops.

Here in San Francisco and Oakland the local chapter of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union has vowed to shut down the two ports this Friday, May 1, to protest police brutality.

May we each find ways to expand the vision of breaking bread together and to create a society in which the basic human rights of all workers, locally and globally, are honored for they are our sisters and brothers. 

I’d like to share with you a prayer in honor of all Immigrants:

 

A PRAYER FOR IMMIGRANTS

By Jessica Vazquez Torres

Source of Life who is known by many names;

Over-turner and illuminator of hearts; 

We gather with gratitude for the earth and all who journey in it.

We are give thanks for the interconnectedness of all creation.

Support for those without support;

Stronghold of those without protection; 

We declare openly the times we have fallen short

From living out the call to justice our sacred stories place upon us;

From recognizing the whole of creation as an extension of our being;

From hearing the plight of the creation yearning for justice;

From seeing the harm our way of life and our policies inflict upon the creation

Jesus, carpenter of Nazareth, asks: What is the greatest commandment?

To love your creator;

To love your neighbor;

To undermine oppressive powers with life-giving actions;

To be in solidarity with all who suffer;

To act for justice;

And to teach others to act for justice

Let us not forget.

Source of Justice who is known by many names; 

Let us not swerve from the path of righteousness that leads to just and equitable relationship.

Open our eyes that we may see the immigrant and undocumented; 

Whose labor enables and sustains our living;

The farm worker, the hotel maid, the line cook, the childcare provider; the healthcare worker;

Give us the courage to stand with those crossing our borders;

Escaping economic oppression and political persecution;

Seeking work to support their families;

Aspiring to participate in the bounty of the creation;

Give us the strength to confront the prejudice and intolerance of those who are fearful; 

And respond by closing our borders to those who sojourn seeking life and opportunity;

Give us the will to leave behind the safety of our sanctuaries and temples; 

And claim our place in the movement to transform the creation;

That our voice, our heart, our spirit will join the voice, heart and spirit of all who

demand to live with respect, justice and peace.

Source of Direction who is known by many names;

In our daily living let us be guided; 

By the highest estimate of the worth and dignity of every person regardless of their legal status;

And let us not forget;

That the creation is founded on justice;

And that we have the moral responsibility to bring forth justice into these times.

Amen.

 

Tribute  Fri, Feb 6 (6-9) and Teach-in, Sat, Feb 7 (9-4)

You are invited to join national and local justice seekers from 20th c. and 21st c. movements for human rights on Friday, Feb. 6 (6pm reception, 7-9 program) in a Tribute honoring the life of Dr. Vincent Harding and Saturday, Feb 7 for an Inter-generational Teach-in (9am registration; 10-4 program). We will engage in deep conversation about the protests against systemic violence against black and brown communities and how to create a movement for radical change. Register now! (Follow the links for Friday and Saturday events below) Space is limited!

Nancy Taylor invites us to attend this event for Black History Month.   She’ll be going to the Saturday event and will coordinate a group and carpool. Mirtha and Johan Langewis-Ninayahuar are joining her – how about you?

Friday’s Tribute (free):  St. Columba Church, 6401 San Pablo Ave., Oakland
To  RSVP Click Here

Saturday’s Teach-in:  Chapel at the Pacific School of Religion, 1798 Scenic Ave., Berkeley
(box lunch included scholarships available)
$15 – at the door;  $11 – online
To register online  Click Here

This past week, I’ve been reading about the early life of Rev. Dr. Howard Thurman. An influential African American author, philosopher, theologian, educator and civil rights leader, Thurman was considered one of the three greatest African-American preachers in the early 20th-century. I find a kindred spirit in his enduring sense of the Divine.

From his journal, he writes:

dreamstimefree_boat and river (1)As a child I was accustomed to spending many hours alone in my rowboat, fishing along the river, when there was no sound save the lapping of the waves against the boat. There were times when it seemed as if the earth and the river and the sky and I were one beat of the same pulse. It was a time of watching and waiting for what I did not know—yet I always knew. There would come a moment when beyond the single pulse beat there was a sense of Presence which seemed always to speak to me. My response to the sense of Presence always had the quality of personal communion. There was no voice. There was no image. There was no vision. There was God. 

I leave you with a blessing for this day, by Howard Thurman

I will lift up mine eyes to life,
lest I miss the turning in the road.
I will lift up mine eyes to love,
that I may not close the door of my heart.
I will lift up mine eyes to God,
that I may meet the divine in all things.

 

black history monthFebruary we lift up Black History Month; we share stories from our own personal and collective histories and lift up the ongoing story of culture, courage, brilliance, faith, and heroism.

We will celebrate this rich legacy through worship, education and events. I encourage you to join us and share your ideas with us!

Our denomination, the United Church of Christ, has a long history of commitment to the ongoing story of liberation and equality in the black civil rights movement; from the Amistad, to ordaining the first black minister in the US, to the presidency. The UCC is forever entwined in the history of a people who stood with courage and pushed forward with faith. I encourage you to read more about our UCC history, in the links below.

http://cpcucc.org/blog/2087/black-history-and-the-united-church-of-christ
http://www.ucc.org/black-history/

I leave you with the inspiring words of Howard Thurman, an influential African American author, philosopher, theologian, educator and civil rights leader, who writes:

“Whatever may be the tensions and the stresses of a particular day, there is always lurking close at hand the trailing beauty of forgotten joy or unremembered peace.” 

 “Don’t ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive, and go do it. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.” 

“There is something in every one of you that waits and listens for the sound of the genuine in yourself. It is the only true guide you will ever have. And if you cannot hear it, you will all of your life spend your days on the ends of strings that somebody else pulls.” 

US civil rights leader Martin Luther King,Jr. (C)This Monday means so many different things to so many people.

To some, it’s a day off from work, and a time to save big on those great MLK sales deals!

For others, it’s a time to remember the great legacy of Dr King.

For others still, it’s a time to lament that he is gone, at a time when we need to keep his dream alive.

Let us, you and I, take time to not only to remember him, but to do what we can together to work for the true equality of all people on this planet.

I leave you with some interesting quotes, not from, but about, Martin Luther King Jr.

“For years, I declined to fill in the form for my Senate press credential that asked me to state my ‘race,’ unless I was permitted to put ‘human.’ The form had to be completed under penalty of perjury, so I could not in conscience put ‘white,’ which is not even a color let alone a ‘race,’ and I sternly declined to put ‘Caucasian,’ which is an exploded term from a discredited ethnology. Surely the essential and unarguable core of King’s campaign was the insistence that pigmentation was a false measure: a false measure of mankind (yes, mankind) and an inheritance from a time of great ignorance and stupidity and cruelty, when one drop of blood could make you ‘black’.” 
― Christopher Hitchens

“The self-congratulatory popular account insists that Dr. King called on the nation to fully accept its own creed, and the walls came a-tumbling down. This conventional narrative is soothing, moving, and politically acceptable, and has only the disadvantage of bearing no resemblance to what actually happened.” 
― Timothy B. TysonBlood Done Sign My Name: A True Story

“Everyone knows, even the smallest kid knows about Martin Luther King Jr., can say his most famous moment was that ‘I have a dream speech. No one can go further than one sentence. All we know is that this had a dream. We do not know what the dream was’.” 
― Henry Louis Taylor

A lot of people are waiting for Martin Luther King or Mahatma Gandhi to come back — but they are gone. We are it. It is up to us. It is up to you.

― Marian Wright Edelman, as quoted in The Art of Winning Commitment : 10 Ways Leaders Can Engage Minds, Hearts, And Spirits (2004) by Dick Richards

– Enjoy this “The Dream of Martin Luther King” video.

US civil rights leader Martin Luther King,Jr. (C)For Skyline’s church service on Sunday, January 18th at 10 am, we will honor the memory of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., his sense of God’s calling in his life, and the larger civil rights movement to which he gave his life.  We will also take seriously our call in this time, to participate in the civil rights movement of our times for greater economic justice, particularly within our country.  Together, one day, we shall overcome!

Our choir director, Joshua Feltman, with the choir will teach the children the song, “The Dream of Martin Luther King”.  It will be lovely!

Please bring with you friends who would be drawn to this celebration.  Please feel free to contact me if you’d like to discuss ways that you’d like to take part at revlauriemanning@aol.com.

Blessings, Pastor Laurie

MoreJackets

Stop Shivering Sunday is a tradition started here by our beloved Kay Gilliland. We collect warm coats and other clothing and take them to East Oakland Community Project (EOCP), East Bay Switchboard, & Bay Area Community Services (BACS) to be given to those in need. Please bring whatever you have on Sunday, Jan. 25th. If possible, bring your contributions in a box. We’ll put all the boxes in a few cars and will take everything to these groups the following week.

Please mark your calendars to bring in those clothes for Sunday, January 25th!  If you can’t be here on the 25th, bring them to the office between 9 and 2 Mon-Fri.

ScarvesThank you for sharing and participating!

Jesus was a very radical dude. In his time,  much like our times in this country, people were very divided one from another. Back then if you were a child or a woman, if you had no money, if you had a disease or a physical disability, or if you came from the wrong country or city or even the wrong family you had no rights and no respect.

Jesus refused to play along with division and discrimination. One of the truly subversive things he not only taught – but did constantly – was to eat, drink, and visit with the outcasts of society.  He hung out with beggars, lepers, prostitutes, children, and even tax collectors. As Thanksgiving approaches we are reminded that we are not only what we eat, we are also with whom we eat. In Jesus’ kingdom & at his table everyone, especially all those considered “the least of these”, is welcome.

This Sunday, we welcome your many food donations for these various causes:

  1.  Alameda County Community Food Bank (canned tuna & chicken, soups & stews, peanut butter, canned foods)
  2.  East Bay Interfaith Immigration Coalition, EOICC, collecting food for undocumented immigrants from Central America.(beans, rice, cooking oil )
  3.  Pies for Lake Merritt United Methodist (ACCFB food pantry’s) Thanksgiving dinner.

Please see the details included below.

We also welcome volunteers to help prepare and serve and share Thanksgiving dinner at Lake Merritt! Please see Paula Byrens for details.

After all of this eating we invite you to work it off on Saturday, Nov 29th, at our “Greening of the Sanctuary” from 8 am – 1 pm.

Oh yes, one more food item – mark your calendars for our Sun Dec 7th Christmas Party, 5 – 8 pm, which includes dinner and a fun program (see details berlow)! If you’d like to help with the food planning, please contact Suzie Harris and Marilyn Shaw.

Blessings, Laurie

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Skyline UCC
A United Church of Christ
12540 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619
(510) 531-8212

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